MOFA unveils new name for Taiwan’s AIT counterpart, lauds robust two-way ties

The MOFA views the new name of Taiwan Council for U.S. Affairs as more representative of the healthy state of Taiwan-U.S. relations. (Staff photo/Chin Hung-hao)
The MOFA views the new name of Taiwan Council for U.S. Affairs as more representative of the healthy state of Taiwan-U.S. relations. (Staff photo/Chin Hung-hao)
 
Taiwan Council for U.S. Affairs is the new name of the organization responsible for handling official exchanges with the American Institute in Taiwan, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs May 25.
 
Formerly known as Coordination Council for North American Affairs, TCUSA will continue carrying out all CCNAA functions, the MOFA said. The renaming better reflects the organization’s functions and underscores the strength of Taiwan-U.S. ties in the 40th year of the Taiwan Relations Act, the ministry added.
 
Cooperation and exchanges between the like-minded partners are going from strength to strength, the MOFA said, adding that this is helping promote peace, stability and inclusive prosperity in the Indo-Pacific and beyond.
 
The strength of this enduring partnership is also underscored by the recent remarks supporting Taiwan by W. Patrick Murphy, acting assistant secretary for Southeast Asia at the Bureau of East Asian Affairs under the U.S. Department of State, the ministry said.
 
Such comments echo those describing Taiwan as a “democratic success story, a reliable partner and a force for good in the world” by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo prior to the opening of the 19th Micronesia Presidents’ Summit Feb. 20-21 in Palau, the MOFA added.
 
According to the ministry, the May 13-21 visit by National Security Council Secretary-General David Tawei Lee to the U.S. is another indicator of the health of Taiwan-U.S. relations.
 
During the trip, Lee discussed and exchanged views on security issues with experts from think tanks like Brookings Institution and Center for Strategic and International Studies, as well as Georgetown University.
 
Lee also attended meetings with officials from the U.S. and Taiwan’s diplomatic allies, where participants reiterated commitment to and support for an open and free Indo-Pacific, the ministry said.