Jump to the main content block

:::

10th session of Legislature’s US caucus holds first meeting

2020-07-22
 
Chairperson of the 10th Legislative Yuan U.S. Caucus Lo Chih-cheng (center) speaks at the friendship group’s opening session July 20 in Taipei City alongside new TECRO in the U.S. Representative Hsiao Bi-khim (left), AIT Director Brent Christensen (second left), LY Secretary-General Lin Chih-chia (second right) and Deputy Foreign Minister Hsu Szu-chien. (CNA)
Chairperson of the 10th Legislative Yuan U.S. Caucus Lo Chih-cheng (center) speaks at the friendship group’s opening session July 20 in Taipei City alongside new TECRO in the U.S. Representative Hsiao Bi-khim (left), AIT Director Brent Christensen (second left), LY Secretary-General Lin Chih-chia (second right) and Deputy Foreign Minister Hsu Szu-chien. (CNA)
 
The 10th Legislative Yuan U.S. Caucus sat for the first time July 20 in Taipei City with the goal of promoting friendly exchanges between lawmakers from the two like-minded partners over the next four years.
 
Comprising 71 legislators primarily from Taiwan’s four largest political parties, the friendship group is chaired by Lo Chih-cheng of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party, with three vice chairs from the DPP and opposition Kuomintang and Taiwan People’s Party, respectively.
 
At the opening ceremony, Hsiao Bi-khim, who was sworn in as head of Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the U.S. a day earlier, said legislative exchanges are key to maintaining strong Taiwan-U.S. relations.
 
Support from the U.S. government has been rock solid in recent years, as evidenced by the passage of legislation such as the TAIPEI Act and Taiwan Travel Act, Hsiao said, adding she will work closely with the caucus and do her best to promote bilateral relations after reporting to her new position in Washington next week.
 
Also at the event, American Institute in Taiwan Director Brent Christensen said the Congressional Taiwan caucuses have ranked among the largest legislative groups in the U.S. for many years. Their counterparts in Taiwan are sure to find new and creative ways to work with the U.S. while advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific, he added.
 
According to caucus chair Lo, he is hoping to lead a delegation to the U.S. early next year after the North American country’s presidential and legislative elections. The group plans to hold discussions with the newly elected members of Congress, he said.
Click Num: