Jump to the main content block

:::

Lighting up schooling hopes, self-supporting youths find their way

2020-09-09
 
World Vision Taiwan and Starbucks have worked together to care for the educational development of indigenous children. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
World Vision Taiwan and Starbucks have worked together to care for the educational development of indigenous children. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
 
Since 1999, World Vision Taiwan and Starbucks have worked together to care for the educational development of indigenous children. Through the “Hope for Indigenous Stars,” every year they finance the education grants, living allowances, accommodation, and cultural knowledge training for indigenous children living in rural townships in central Taiwan, and support services including after-school care, career development, talent learning, and cultural inheritance for children living in rural townships. This year, it is the 22nd anniversary of the “Hope for Indigenous Stars.” Most of the children who have been funded by the “Hope for Indigenous Stars” have now become adults and even returned to their hometowns, hoping to do their best to serve the next generation.
 
From being helped to helping others (From beneficiaries to donors)   
Stories about the changes in self-supporting youths
 
Chia-Ming Sung, who had been a beneficiary of World Vision Taiwan’s “Hope for Indigenous Stars, became the social worker to accompany and help disadvantaged children. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
Chia-Ming Sung, who had been a beneficiary of World Vision Taiwan’s “Hope for Indigenous Stars, became the social worker to accompany and help disadvantaged children. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
 
Chia-Ming Sung, who has been a social worker of Shuili Student Center for nearly 5 years, came from a poor family and could not concentrate on study because he often needed to help with chores. After the Chichi earthquake, out of coincidence he became a beneficiary of World Vision Taiwan’s “Hope for Indigenous Stars,” which has enabled him to receive steady education. Due to his beneficiary past, he decided to study social work later. According to him, although he can understand more and better about the needs and difficulties of disadvantaged children, as a social worker, he needs to face more diversified challenges when dealing with new-generation children. For children of the next generation to get out of the box, believing that every child has talent, he decided to accompany and help them find their own way to pursue their dreams with courage.
 
After graduation, Ival Maitangan decided to return to schools in indigenous townships to share her experience and knowledge as a “teacher” to broaden the vision of indigenous children for them to explore the future. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
After graduation, Ival Maitangan decided to return to schools in indigenous townships to share her experience and knowledge as a “teacher” to broaden the vision of indigenous children for them to explore the future. (photo by World Vision Taiwan)
 
Because her sister was a program beneficiary, Ival Maitangan, who has just graduated from the National Taipei University of Education, had the opportunity to join World Vision Taiwan’s “Hope for Indigenous Stars” when she was little. Through the support of the program and social workers, she could go to school steadily. In addition, she successfully enrolled at the National Taipei University of Education and even completed a study tour in the USA with the school’s resources and the exchange student opportunity through her own efforts. From her rich study experience, she realized, “Studying away from home allows me to understand the extremely big difference between urban children and indigenous children because of the differences in the environment and resources.” Therefore, the idea of contributing to the hometown began to grow in the mind of Ival Maitangan. After graduation, she decided to return to schools in indigenous townships to share her experience and knowledge as a “teacher” to broaden the vision of indigenous children for them to explore the future.
 
Whether Chia-Ming Sung or Ival Maitangan, these self-supporting youths are the best examples of how indigenous children have been changed by the “Hope for Indigenous Stars” over the past 22 years. In addition, the program has enabled this “legacy” of love and knowledge to be multiplied in indigenous townships for future generations, allowing disadvantaged indigenous children living in this environment to break through the confines, find their own life, and flip the future of indigenous townships.
 
Click Num: